Farmer FoodShare Donation Station coming to JCFM

In the coming weeks, you will see a new booth at the market.  There will be a Farmer FoodShare Donation station set up so that you can buy food at the market and donate to locals in need.  You can also donate money that will be used to buy food from the market vendors.

This is how it works: Farmer Foodshare volunteers run tables at farmers markets where farmers can donate local food for folks in need in their own area. Shoppers help, too. They may choose to donate fresh produce bought at the market or donate cash to buy food from the farmers, helping them earn a healthy living. All this fresh food is then shared with local agencies serving neighbors in need. (http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/our-approach/#donation-station)

This helps both those who are struggling with food insecurity for themselves and their families and it helps support the farmers and vendors who grew, raised or created the food, while focusing on the local community as a whole.

Here are some statistics, especially regarding hunger in North Carolina.

DESPITE BEING THE 8TH LARGEST AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER IN THE COUNTRY, NORTH CAROLINA IS THE 9TH MOST HUNGRY STATE.

 

1 in 4 children, 1 in 5 adults

IN NC SUFFER FROM HUNGER OR FOOD INSECURITY

(Feeding America, NC Food Banks)

FOOD INSECURE (ADJ.) – LACKING ACCESS TO A SUFFICIENT QUANTITY OF AFFORDABLE, NUTRITIOUS FOOD

Family farms are essential to a strong, healthy community.

ECONOMIC

4X THE JOBS AND GREATER MARKET RESILIENCY

  • Compared to non-local, sales in local food support 4x the jobs. 
  • Domestic production and local markets create a more resilient future food system (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

ENVIRONMENTAL

SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH STEWARDSHIP

  • Industrial agriculture is the biggest source of pollution to lakes and rivers in the United States, and the global food system is responsible for 40% of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • More than half of all U.S. crop land harvested is corn and soy. Monoculture farms are more dependent on chemical fertilizers, while small and diversified farms more often use sustainable practices. (World Future CouncilUnited Nations Food and Agriculture Organization)

HEALTH

 

WIDESPREAD ACCESS TO REAL FOOD

  • Americans spend 90% of their food budget on processed foods, a major contributor to diet and weight related illnesses
  • Sufficient access to fresh fruits and vegetables is lacking in many communities. Small farms selling locally help alleviate the national problem of food deserts. (Fast Food Nation)

SOCIAL

RECONNECTING TO OUR FOOD

  • Restoring the connection between farmers and the public is essential to long-term change in our food system. Direct market sales promote communication between growers and eater about the challenges facing sustainable small farming. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Source: http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/theneed

If you’d like to know more, please visit http://www.farmerfoodshare.org and if you’d like to volunteer to run the Donation Station, please contact Lisa McBride at jacksoncountyfarmersmarket@gmail.com or click here for the signup form.

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