Farmer FoodShare Donation Station coming to JCFM

In the coming weeks, you will see a new booth at the market.  There will be a Farmer FoodShare Donation station set up so that you can buy food at the market and donate to locals in need.  You can also donate money that will be used to buy food from the market vendors.

This is how it works: Farmer Foodshare volunteers run tables at farmers markets where farmers can donate local food for folks in need in their own area. Shoppers help, too. They may choose to donate fresh produce bought at the market or donate cash to buy food from the farmers, helping them earn a healthy living. All this fresh food is then shared with local agencies serving neighbors in need. (http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/our-approach/#donation-station)

This helps both those who are struggling with food insecurity for themselves and their families and it helps support the farmers and vendors who grew, raised or created the food, while focusing on the local community as a whole.

Here are some statistics, especially regarding hunger in North Carolina.

DESPITE BEING THE 8TH LARGEST AGRICULTURAL PRODUCER IN THE COUNTRY, NORTH CAROLINA IS THE 9TH MOST HUNGRY STATE.

 

1 in 4 children, 1 in 5 adults

IN NC SUFFER FROM HUNGER OR FOOD INSECURITY

(Feeding America, NC Food Banks)

FOOD INSECURE (ADJ.) – LACKING ACCESS TO A SUFFICIENT QUANTITY OF AFFORDABLE, NUTRITIOUS FOOD

Family farms are essential to a strong, healthy community.

ECONOMIC

4X THE JOBS AND GREATER MARKET RESILIENCY

  • Compared to non-local, sales in local food support 4x the jobs. 
  • Domestic production and local markets create a more resilient future food system (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

ENVIRONMENTAL

SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH STEWARDSHIP

  • Industrial agriculture is the biggest source of pollution to lakes and rivers in the United States, and the global food system is responsible for 40% of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • More than half of all U.S. crop land harvested is corn and soy. Monoculture farms are more dependent on chemical fertilizers, while small and diversified farms more often use sustainable practices. (World Future CouncilUnited Nations Food and Agriculture Organization)

HEALTH

 

WIDESPREAD ACCESS TO REAL FOOD

  • Americans spend 90% of their food budget on processed foods, a major contributor to diet and weight related illnesses
  • Sufficient access to fresh fruits and vegetables is lacking in many communities. Small farms selling locally help alleviate the national problem of food deserts. (Fast Food Nation)

SOCIAL

RECONNECTING TO OUR FOOD

  • Restoring the connection between farmers and the public is essential to long-term change in our food system. Direct market sales promote communication between growers and eater about the challenges facing sustainable small farming. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)

Source: http://www.farmerfoodshare.org/theneed

If you’d like to know more, please visit http://www.farmerfoodshare.org and if you’d like to volunteer to run the Donation Station, please contact Lisa McBride at jacksoncountyfarmersmarket@gmail.com or click here for the signup form.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Why you should buy your tomatoes and other veggies at the farmers market

Source & full article https://www.treehugger.com/green-food/why-modern-tomato-tastes-cardboard.html

Here’s an article on why the modern tomato tastes like cardboard from Tree Hugger:

Summer tomatoes are so filled with promise: The deep, saturated color; the unique grassy fragrance; the expectation of a mouthful of sweet-salty tomato exuberance. But alas, supermarket-tomato after supermarket-tomato do little more than disappoint. How can a fruit with such potential constantly taste like a slightly-salty-watery-nothing at best, and a mealy globe of cardboard at worst?

We know that modern tomatoes are picked green and bred for pest-resistance, shipping and shelf life and that the agriculture industry creates produce designed for profit not flavor. Are these the factors to blame for the tomato’s blasé demeanor?

Even when allowed to ripen on the vine and shipped with great care, modern tomatoes are still insipid. Researchers have been looking into this tomato matter, and have recently uncovered a genetic cause for the fruit’s tedium.

The mischievous culprit is a gene mutation discovered accidentally around 70 years ago, and quickly latched onto by tomato breeders; in fact, now the mutation has been deliberately bred into nearly all modern tomatoes. Why? It makes them a uniform and seductive deep scarlet red when ripe.

Unfortunately for tomato-lovers, as reported in a paper published in the journal, Science, the red-making mutation deactivates an important gene responsible for producing the sugar and aromas that are essential for a fragrant and flavorful tomato.

When researchers “turned on” the deactivated gene, the fruit had 20 percent more sugar and 20 to 30 percent more carotenoids when ripe – yet its non-uniform color and greenish pallor suggest that mainstream breeders will not be following suit. So we’re stuck with beautiful tomatoes that taste like a mere hint of their former selves.

Yet, for anyone with a nearby farmer’s market or a garden in back, there is a workaround for cardboard-flavored tomatoes. Heirloom tomatoes and wild species have not had the tomato-ness sucked out of them by selective breeding – so shop for them, or grow them yourself. They may not look like the Disney version of a perfect fruit, but they actually taste like, get this, tomatoes!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Farmers Markets Stimulate Local Economies

Icon_EconomySource: http://farmersmarketcoalition.org/education/stimulate-local-economies/

With little fanfare, the nation’s several thousand farmers markets are growing jobs and strengthening local and regional economies. As demand grows for fresh local food, and shoppers seek relationships with the farms that make such food possible, farmers markets represent an important retail option that bolster local economies in communities large and small.

  • Growers selling locally create 13 full time jobs per $1 million in revenue earned. Those that do not sell locally create 3.
  • For every $100 spent at a farmers market, $62 stays in the local economy, and $99 stays in state.
  • 41% of shoppers at Portland (Oregon) Farmers Markets said that their main reason for shopping at these markets was to support the local economy.
  • In Iowa and Oklahoma, every dollar spent at farmers markets led to an additional $0.58 – $1.36 in sales at other nearby businesses.
  • Wyoming’s economy was bolstered by more than $2.2 million in 2012 from sales at the state’s farmers markets.
  • In 2011, Glenwood Sunday Market in Chicago, Illinois had an estimated economic impact of $1.3 million, including sales to other businesses made possible by the market.
  • A 2010 study by USDA’s Economic Research Service compared producers selling salad mix, blueberries, milk, beef and apples locally with producers of the same products selling to mainstream supply chains. “In all five cases, nearly all of the wage and proprietor income earned in the local market chains is retained in the local economy”.
  • At the Crescent City Farmers Market in New Orleans, 32% of Market shoppers spend money at nearby businesses, resulting in $3.2 million in projected gross receipts and an annual contribution of $151,621 to local sales tax revenue.
  • The 52 producers of the Williamsburg Farmers Market in Virginia generated an estimated $48,969 in state sales tax in 2011, supporting the state economy.
  • Boise, Idaho’s Capital City Public Market generated an estimated $4.5 million in economic activity for the local economy in 2011.
  • A Virginia Cooperative Extension report showed if households in Southern Virginia spent 15% of their weekly food budget on locally grown food products, $90 million in new farm income would be created for the region.

Research shows, too, that farmers markets spur spending at neighboring businesses.  A 2010 study of the Easton Farmers Market in Pennsylvania, for example, found that 70% of farmers market customers are also shopping at downtown businesses, spending up to an extra $26,000 each week.

The 52 producers of the Williamsburg Farmers Market in Virginia generated an estimated $48,969.84 in state sales tax in 2011, supporting the state economy.  Thirty-two percent of Crescent City Farmers Market shoppers in New Orleans report spending money at nearby businesses, resulting in $3.2 million in projected gross receipts and an annual contribution of $151,621 to local sales tax revenue.

A 2011 Economic Research Service report found that fruit and vegetable farms selling into local and regional markets employ 13 fulltime workers per $1 million in revenue earned, for a total of 61,000 jobs in 2008. Comparatively, fruit and vegetable farms that are not selling locally employed only 3 fulltime workers per $1 million in revenue.

“Farmers markets are the ultimate green sector of the economy. They are stand-out successes in and spurring sustainable economic development.” Bernadine Prince, President, Farmers Market Coalition

“Farmers Markets are the most genuine type of commerce. Selling at the market
allowed us to start our business slowly and focus on building our brand and customer base. It gave us confidence. We wouldn’t be here without the market.” Freddy Kaufmann, Owner, Proper Sausages, Miami Shores, Florida

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

July 1st at the Market

Chrysalis Earth Farm will have duck eggs, arugula, kale and salad greens plus more.

Naked Sunflower Gardens will be returning with their heirloom vegetables.

Graceland Garden will have potatoes, swiss chard, summer squash, fresh-cut lemon, lime and sweet basils, plus eggs.  Also coffee cup houseplants are back along with marigolds, catnip plants and dried catnip.

The Dawson Green will be at the market with greens, starter plants herbs and much more.

Full Spectrum Farm will be at the market with sugar snap peas, carrots, onions, garlic, oregano, mint, flows and crafts: bracelets, paper bead necklaces and their new owl paintings.

Kathy’s Herbals will be at the market with all natural insect repellant sprays, poison ivy and insect bite relief salve and spray, and a fresh batch of her latest new lip balm that contains clove and chickweed extracts.

Happy-Go-Lucky Foods will be there with vegan and organic granola and protein bars!

Peacegoods will be at the market with her hand-sewn toys and crafts!

Linda’s Veggies will be at the market tomorrow.

Footshines is a foot massage chair designed and operated by licensed massage therapist, Casey Taylor LMBT 9443. While traveling in Canada one summer, Casey noticed an old fashioned shoe shine stand and realized that as much as she loved the nostalgic idea, she really wanted her feet shined. That simple desire morphed into a detailed setup where weary travelers and worn neighbors alike can sit, have their feet cleaned by a fresh towel steeped in flower essences, and enjoy a thorough foot massage with essential oils. A session takes either 5 or 10 minutes, but lasts all day.

Peaceful Valley Nursery will be at the market this weekend.

Paula’s Cards will be at the market with her lovely handmade cards, weather permitting.

Orchard Slope Family Farm will be returning to the market this weekend.

The Barkers will be at the market with cauliflower, broccoli, onions, beets and potatoes.

Jozef Mazurowski will be there with his wood crafts.

Lynn Cochran will be there with vegetables & blueberries.

Mostly Natives will be at the market with his lovely array of native plants.

Haversack Coffee will be there with freshly brewed coffee.

Herbal Ridge will be at the market with her handmade soaps, lotions, beard care, plus more beautiful products for body and home.

Nantahala Heirlooms will be at the market with their heirloom produce.

Dark Cove will be back with Goat Cheese and Goat Meat (avg 2 lb roasts; ham, shoulder, and loin).

Berry Farms is back at the market with lots of veggies.

Pineapple Sage Herb plant and their line of dried herbs, spices, teas and potpourri.

Moonshine Mtn. Candlz will have their lovely handmade candles and tye-died T-shirts!

Signature Brew/Sylva Market will be there with both hot and iced coffee.

Vegenui Garden will be at the market this week with greens (and FREE recipes), plus English, Snap & Snow Peas and raspberries.

Bud’s Bees will be at the market with fresh, local honey!

Cold Mountain Angus Beef will be at the market with grass-fed beef and pasture-raised poultry.

Balltown Bee Farm will be at the market with honey, eggs, produce and honey products.

Clean Slate Coalition will be in attendance with all-natural cleaning products and handmade fabric items.

Mason Claine Pottery will be back at the market this weekend.

Regular Vendors that are not able to attend this weekend:
A Dog’s Life
Ladybug Farms Pottery
Allyson Gernardt Jewelry
The Edge
Backwoods Bakery
Pomme de Terre

Please note that these are all subject to change without previous notice but we do our best to get you the most up-to-date info we can provide.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Power of Produce Club

 

An exciting new program for children will be starting this July at the Jackson County Farmers Market! Power of the Produce (POP) Club provides a fun opportunity for children to engage in the local food system through conversations directly with farmers, educational games and demonstrations, and exposure to new fruits and vegetables. POP Club will meet at the downtown Jackson County Farmers Market the last three Saturdays in July (15th, 22nd, and 29th). The program will begin at 10:00AM and will last for no more than one hour. In addition to participating in fun educational activities such as food art and a scavenger hunt, POP Club kids will receive prizes for each day they attend, and a $5.00 voucher to spend at the Jackson County Farmers Market each Saturday that will allow them to make their own shopping decisions at the market. Any child in grades K-5 is welcome to attend. Participation each Saturday will be on a first-come-first-serve basis limited to 15 children and a care taker for the child has to be in attendance the whole time. This program is locally sponsored by: The Great Smokies Health Foundation, Harris Regional Hospital, Western Carolina University’s Dietetic Internship Program, The Jackson County Department of Public Health, Jackson County Farmers Market and the Healthy for Life action team of Healthy Carolinians.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tomorrow at the Market 

Jackson County Transit will be our guest at the market. Please stop by their booth for more information about how they serve our community.

Chef Gary from The Community Table will be sampling greens for our Market Bites this Saturday. Donations will support The Community Table and JCFM

Peaceful Valley Nursery will be at the market this weekend.

The Hofeld’s will be at the market with heirloom produce.

Dave’s Blueberries will be at the market this weekend.

Paula’s Cards will be at the market with her lovely handmade cards.

The Barkers will be at the market with cauliflower, broccoli, onions, beets and potatoes.

Backwoods Bakery will be at the market with their fresh baked breads, sweets, and other incredible creations.

Jozef Mazurowski will be there with his wood crafts!

Kathy’s Herbals will be at the market with her herbal and aromatherapy salves, tinctures, lotions, creams, and more. She will also have her Polarity bodywork chair set up by 10, maybe sooner. Sessions are $1/minute, for as few or as many minutes as one cares to receive. A typical session is generally 5- 20 minutes. Polarity bodywork feels like a cross between massage, reiki and acupressure.

Registered Nursery will be there with her plants and lovely jewelry.

Lynn Cochran will be at the market for the first time this season.

Mason Claine Pottery will be at the market with her beautiful pottery.

Mostly Natives will be at the market with his lovely array of native plants.

Herbal Ridge will be at the market with her handmade soaps, lotions, beard care, plus more beautiful products for body and home.

Nantahala Heirlooms will be at the market with their heirloom produce.

Dark Cove will be back with Goat Cheese and Goat Meat (avg 2 lb roasts; ham, shoulder, and loin).

Berry Farms is back at the market with lots of veggies.

Pineapple Sage Herb plant and their line of dried herbs, spices, teas and potpourri.

Moonshine Mtn. Candlz will have their lovely handmade candles and tye-died T-shirts!

Signature Brew/Sylva Market will be there with both hot and iced coffee.

Happy-Go-Lucky Foods will be there with vegan and organic granola and protein bars!

Vegenui Garden will be at the market this week with greens (and FREE recipes), plus English, Snap & Snow Peas and raspberries.

Haversack Coffee will be there with freshly brewed coffee!

The Dawson Green is planning on lots of lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes, kale and collards.

Peacegoods will be there with her sweet collection of handmade bags, toys, etc.

Bud’s Bees will be at the market with fresh, local honey!

Graceland Gardens will have bright lights chard, snowpeas, aspabroc, lettuce turnips and eggs. She will also have squash, and pepper plants, herb and flower plants.

Cold Mountain Angus Beef will be at the market with grass-fed beef and pasture-raised poultry.

Balltown Bee Farm will be at the market with honey, eggs, produce and honey products.

Chrysalis Earth Farm will have their sping mix, Tuscan kale, parsley, cilantro, duck eggs, radishes and garlic scapes

Allyson Gernardt will be there with her unique jewelry, plus new designs.

Ladybug Farms Pottery will be back this weekend with her lovely, handmade pottery.

Full Spectrum Farms will be at the market this week with crafts (bracelets, paintings and pottery), garden plants, eggs, flowers. 

Worley Farms will be at the market with pork, milk products, vegetables and crafts!

Linda Kinnear will be at the market with her vegetables.

Orchard Slope Family Farm will be there with chicken, quail and duck.

A Dogs’ Life will be there with their homemade pet beds and toys.

Clean Slate Coalition will be in attendance with all-natural cleaning products and handmade fabric items.

Regular Vendors that are not able to attend this weekend:

Pomme de Terre

Armor Farms will not be with us for the rest of the season.

Please note that these are all subject to change without previous notice but we do our best to get you the most up-to-date info we can provide.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tomorrow at JCFM 


Dave’s Blueberries will make his first appearance at the market this weekend.

Paula’s Cards will be at the market with her lovely handmade cards.

Backwoods Bakery & Pizza Wagon will be back at the market with their fresh baked breads, sweets, and other incredible creations, plus they will have their awesome pizza back this weekend! 

We are also welcoming Keegan Hofeld, who has heirloom produce.

Peaceful Valley Nursery will be at the market this weekend.

We are happy to have Jozef Mazurowski back at the market with his wood crafts!

Kathy’s Herbals will be at the market with her herbal and aromatherapy salves, tinctures, lotions, creams, and more. She will also have her Polarity bodywork chair set up by 10, maybe sooner. Sessions are $1/minute, for as few or as many minutes as one cares to receive. A typical session is generally 5- 20 minutes. Polarity bodywork feels like a cross between massage, reiki and acupressure.

Registered Nursery will be there with her plants and jewelry.

Mason Claine Pottery will be at the market with her beautiful pottery.

Mostly Natives will be at the market with his lovely array of native plants.

Dark Cove will be back with Goat Cheese and Goat Meat (avg 2 lb roasts; ham, shoulder, and loin).

Berry Farms is back at the market with lots of veggies.

Pineapple Sage Herb plant and their line of dried herbs, spices, teas and potpourri.

Moonshine Mtn. Candlz will have their lovely handmade candles and tye-died T-shirts!

Signature Brew/Sylva Market will be there with both hot and iced coffee.

Happy-Go-Lucky Foods will be there with vegan and organic granola and protein bars!

Vegenui Garden will be at the market this week with greens (and FREE recipes), plus English, Snap & Snow Peas and raspberries.

Haversack Coffee will be there with freshly brewed coffee!

The Dawson Green is planning on lots of lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes, kale and collards.

Bud’s Bees will be at the market with fresh, local honey!

Graceland Garden will have greens, aspabroc, cabbage, snow peas, turnips and eggs. She will also have squash, and pepper plants, herb and flower plants.

Cold Mountain Angus Beef will be at the market with grass-fed beef and pasture-raised poultry.

Chrysalis Earth Farm will have their sping mix, Tuscan kale, parsley, cilantro, duck eggs, radishes and garlic scapes

Allyson Gernardt will be there with her unique jewelry.

Ladybug Farms Pottery will be back this weekend with her lovely, handmade pottery.

Full Spectrum Farms will be at the market this week with crafts (bracelets, paintings and pottery), garden plants, eggs, flowers. 

Worley Farms will be at the market with pork, milk products, vegetables and crafts!

Orchard Slope Family Farm will be there with chicken, quail and duck.

Peacegoods will be there with her sweet collection of handmade bags, toys, etc.

Balltown Bee Farm will be at the market with honey, eggs, produce and honey products.  

Clean Slate Coalition will be in attendance with all-natural cleaning products and handmade fabric items.
Regular Vendors that are not able to attend this weekend:

Pomme de Terre

Herbal Ridge

Nantahala Heirlooms

Please note that these are all subject to change without previous notice but we do our best to get you the most up-to-date info we can provide.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment